expired 128GB Samsung EVO Plus MicroSD Card $18.88 USD ($28.00 NZD) Shipped @ Joybuy.com

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Cheapest these cards have ever been, pricing is just ridiculous! 256gb cards are also just $41.99 usd ($62.26 nzd) link here:

https://joybuy.com/600240404.html

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Comments

  •  

    If you do buy a memory card or USB drive from overseas, run H2testw on it to confirm that it's not fake.

    Often memory cards with prices that are too good to be true are actually far lower-capacity cards that read and write very slowly. They display on your computer as the claimed capacity, but then fail to write any files past the 8gb or 16gb that they actually have.

    Given that this card costs NZ$60-100 retail here, it's entirely possible that a NZ$28 version is fake.

  •  

    Bought a 128 GB NZ$40 from joybuy and are genuine

  • -3 votes

    I have to say I would never buy an SD card from anywhere other than a reputable established retailer. Fakes are so rampant that often lower quality cards (less reliable) of the same storage capacity are relabelled as Samsung or SanDisk, making them virtually impossible to detect with any kind of software.

    • +1 vote

      Bruh, you don't trust the amazon of China? "Richard Liu is the founder of JD.com (NASDAQ:JD) and Joybuy.com, China's largest online retail sales company, and has been its Chairman and CEO since the company's inception."
      Does this mean you don't order off amazon either?

      • +1 vote

        I've received fake Micro SD cards which are orders "fulfilled by Amazon". It's a widespread issue that Amazon and other retailers are well aware of, it takes only a Google search to find hundreds of anecdotes — I'm far from comfortable trusting JD. The issue is that the cards are incredibly easy to counterfeit, and incredibly hard to detect by the end user — different from other products like laptops, phones, etc which I have ordered from both JD and Amazon.

        H2testw doesn't do anything to check how reliable the card is going to be down the road, it only checks the read/write speed and whether the card has the listed capacity on the sticker. A SanDisk engineer estimated a third of supposed SanDisk cards out in the wild are fakes: https://petapixel.com/2011/05/20/one-third-of-the-sandisk-me...

        • +3 votes

          I'm somewhat with justinh here. I mean depending on my requirements, I may buy a one of these cards. But I'd do so with the assumption it hopefully an okay unbranded card which could be a Samsung but who knows, rather than treat it as a Samsung. There's no real way for an end user to be sure a card is real or counterfeit other than by trusting that the supplier has a very good supply chain which prevents counterfeits getting in. I mean there are the very bad counterfeits with fake capacity, low read or write speeds or poor printing etc, but there are the counterfeits which are almost indistinguishable. Even manufacturers sometimes have difficult detecting counterfeits. And for me, while Joybuy is far better than your bog standard Chinese retailer, I still wouldn't entirely trust them for something like SD cards.

    • +1 vote

      Jd is a reputable retailer and there have been several deals over the years on the sd cards and we would have heard reports if they are fakes.

      Additionally fake sd cars are usually sold by 3rd parties (hence fulfilled by amazon rather than sold by amazon). These stocks are sold and shipped by JD.

      I have no intention of buying sd cards from JD. But its rather unfortunate that you decided to diss this deal based on experience from other retailers.

      • +1 vote

        JD didn't even launch their English facing e-commerce portal until earlier this year, so I'm not quite sure what you're saying when there have been deals from them "over the years". My point is that if you value your data highly, then you should be extra vigilant of new sellers and e-commerce platforms. Amazon can't stamp out fake SD cards in their own warehouses at this point.

        • +2 votes

          In regards to your Amazon comment. There is a difference between "Ships from and sold by Amazon.com" and "Sold by xxx and Fulfilled by Amazon". As you mentioned yours were fulfilled by Amazon which means Amazon only holds the items on the sellers behalf in their warehouse to enable faster dispatch service to its customers. When an item is fulfilled by Amazon, they have nothing to do with the item as they are not the ones selling it.

          •  

            @Tomo: The issue is that to save space, the items are mixed together at the distribution centre's as they have the same barcodes on the packaging. This means real Amazon.com stock is mixed together with Fulfilled by Amazon stock. It only takes one seller to go rouge for counterfeits to get in the system. A real product sourced by Amazon sits right next to one sourced from a third party.

            https://www.wsj.com/articles/on-amazon-pooled-merchandise-op...

            As more third-party sellers have signed up to offer products through Amazon and use its order-fulfillment services, the Seattle-based giant has allowed many to pool their inventory with supposedly identical items supplied by other sellers—in essence commingling products from third-party merchants with those supplied directly to Amazon by the brands themselves.

            Sometimes, fakes can get mixed in. Justin Dunham, a mathematics professor in Kansas City, Mo., said his wife bought him what was supposed to be a Tovolo King Cube Ice Tray from Amazon. A receipt for the $8.50 purchase shows it was sold by Amazon, not a third-party seller. […] A few other Amazon customers also complained in reviews that the trays they received were imitations. It wasn't clear which seller supplied the trays to the warehouse.

            •  

              @justinh: Dont see how that's relevant to JD here, are you saying because Amazon couldn't get their acts together when it comes to warehousing all b2c retailers should be viewed as allowing counterfeit units to be sold on their platforms?

              Also what's stopping a rogue NZ based retailer from parallel importing products from overseas hence risk getting counterfeit products? Noel Leeming etc has been caught time and time again that they would knowingly abusing consumer rights.

              •  

                @Zyo: My point is that fake SD cards are such a widespread issue that even Amazon can't get them out of their own warehouses. With such a low price tag and an overseas company, I simply don't trust the verification processes — especially when a person has claimed they've received dodgy cards from them before. https://www.cheapies.nz/node/16589#comment-36832

                With a local retailer, you have some some recourse like the CGA which you absolutely don't get when you buy on Joybuy. Part of the higher price is the fact that they generally choose the most reliable and established vendors to buy from.

  • +3 votes

    I've tested 9 cards from Joybuy using H2testw and two other programs.

    I haven't found any faulty or fake ones yet.

    A very good price for 128GB card.
    $29.09 when ordered today with PayPal.
    (Exchange rates vary from day to day)

  • +2 votes

    If you buy the 256 GB card, be sure to pay via PayPal to get an additional $5 (USD) off (for orders over $40)!

  •  

    Anyone know of any deals with low capacity (8-16GB) MicroSD cards? I need a few and I'm looking to spend ~$5 a card.

  •  

    Waiting for xiaomi dafang deals…

  •  

    Ships to US only?

  • +3 votes

    I think some of you are missing the point, these SD cards work to spec .They have the same reading right speed and storage capacity as per Samsung 128 GB specifications .As for reliability, Any SD cards are Notoriously unreliable .BACK THEM UP !!. These SD cards are low end ,Genuine or not they are only suitable for action cameras ,smart phones and point and shoot cameras etc .The biggest problem with fake SD cards ,is there stated capacity and speed .

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