[Price Error] Apple 9.7-inch iPad Wi-Fi + Cellular 32GB - Silver $529 Delivered @ Heathcote Appliances

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could be a price error. This is the latest model 9.7" iPad with Cellular(4G), normally retails for $759.

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Heathcote Appliances
Heathcote Appliances

Comments

  •  

    Looks like price error for sure! Excellent find though.

  •  

    Really thhinking of pulling the trigger on this!

  •  

    Pretty good price for someone looking for the ipad. I tried with Noel Leemings price match and they said they can't price match this at the moment as they believe this is a price error and they would have to get back tomorrow morning. Chances are Heathcote would also cancel the order if its a price error on their side.

  • -3 votes

    Not price error. This price is also for new on trademe same price. Also this is about the price it's sold on Amazon.

    • +2 votes

      Not sure where u are getting these prices on trademe for a cellular model and also comparing it to Amazon? where there is import fees and tax + shipping prices?

  •  

    nice deal. thx finding it out!

  •  

    And the link is dead

  •  

    Have been called - they said it is a pricing error. Best deal they can do is $719.. ($10 off what's advertised online). What's the law with stuff like this? I can imagine $5.29 not holding up.. but $529 is like 30% off which is a typical sale price?

    • +2 votes

      Well the law for this has pretty much shown that if the retailer sold items which was a price error, they are able to cancel the order and refund you. As shown in the Harvey Norman case in 2015. In the Commission's view the advertisement of incorrect prices was a one-off, short term event that was unlikely to be repeated; the company did not financially gain from the conduct, nor did it cause harm to its competitors; and although consumers could not buy the products at the prices advertised, and may have been inconvenienced, there was unlikely to have been any direct financial loss to consumers.

      •  

        I was thinking about that case when I posted my comment. I couldn't recall if people managed to pull the trigger and pay for goods with Harvey Norman. In this instance with Heathcotes 6 customers did pull the trigger, and their credit cards have been charged - so the sale was finalised online. I'm just curious to know whether the finalisation of the sale (and the charging of a credit card) still provides the seller with the ability to back out. Again, this isn't a $5.29 (99% off) or $52.90 (90% off), this is 30% off retail price.

        • +1 vote

          Harvey Norman also had people get their cards charged and money taken out. Hence why there was a huge debate on whether if it was a legally binding contract but still got ruled as a mistake so the sales were void.

        •  

          @Tomo: ok cheers Tomo, good to know. Was worth a try!

        •  

          @Tomo: The difference here is that HN had a T&C that created an issue. Their own T&C's (which they changed after people pointed it out to them) is that they "accepted" the sale on delivery or when an invoice was produced. Their online system creates an invoice at time of payment meaning they accepted the sale at the price on their site. Again when people pointed this out HN then removed the button to be able to view and download invoices online and hiding the fact that their own T&C's said they accepted the sale. If people did not get a copy of the invoice before they removed the button then they could not longer get proof of an invoice being produced.

          So did people get what they ordered? I can't say, but the view of the disputes tribunal on what HN did was not overly good for them.

    •  

      Margins on Apple products are very slim. You will almost never see a 30% discount on Apple products for this reason. The only time I've seen a 30% discount on Apple products is when Dick Smith was in trouble.

      •  

        Just to be clear I was referring to general sale prices for electronics. A consumer doesn't need to know or understand the underlying markup on a product. But this discount was in line with what is often seen with TV's and other electronics where a discount of 25-40% can happen.

        • +1 vote

          The biggest difference between this and the Harvey Norman one was that the discounted price on those were like 80% off or something and the case here is more like a 30% off. And I think the court did rule that its a one off thing and they shouldnt have issues like this occuring again. With all that in mind, there is nothing stopping you from taking action against this and if you think that you have a very good explanation then you could actually win. The main thing is usually are you willing to use time and effort to deal with this.

          Its been like this for most retailers they will just deny you as most of them know the majority will not waste time taking legal actions/means. I've had trouble getting some stores to fix my stuff even under warranty, and also CGA. Its pretty tough and a hit and miss depending on who you get at the store.

    • +1 vote

      I guess it's harder (almost impossible) for them to cancel the deal if you got it in store.

  •  

    I've seen a few price error deals on Ozbargain. Best chance seems to be rush in store and get it. Anything else likely to get canceled unless gets to "shipped". Of course, ethically questionable.

  • +1 vote

    Price errors at the Warehouse seem to get honoured, not sure if this is policy or a lack of protocol.

    •  

      Maybe it is the sign of a good company. I have always found the warehouse to provide really good aftersales service. Also I don't think companies can keep making errors, as the pricing should be correct.